GSMA publishes IoT security guidelines – aims to boost growth

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The GSMA, an official body which represents telecom companies, has published guidelines today which aim to ensure the secure deployment of IoT services and devices. Developed in consultation with the mobile industry, ‘The GSMA IoT Security Guidelines’ will help to boost growth of this exciting sector. 

“As billions of devices become connected in the...

By Ryan Daws, 09 February 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Connectivity, Consumers, Disruption, Industry, Infrastructure, IoT, M2M, Networks, Operators, Security.

Nokia improves network security with NetGuard

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Nokia has launched a network-wide tool called NetGuard this morning, providing operators with an easy-to-use platform to monitor and control all the multi-vendor security systems deployed across its telecommunications network.

Since moving away from their handset business – after selling the division to Microsoft in 2013 – Nokia has focused on its network...

By Ryan Daws, 02 February 2016, 2 comments. Categories: Infrastructure, IoT, M2M, Networks, Security.

Everyone hates the UK's proposed Investigatory Powers Bill

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First it was privacy activists, then a range of technology companies, and now even the defence industry is laying out reasons why the UK's proposed Investigatory Powers Bill is a terrible idea. 

In a submission to a parliamentary scrutiny committee overseeing the draft investigatory powers bill, a coalition formed of players from the British aerospace, defence, security...

By Ryan Daws, 08 January 2016, 0 comments. Categories: Government, Industry, Privacy, Security, Surveillance.

"Snooper's Charter" revisions criticised by Snowden, privacy activists

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Alleged revisions of the Investigatory Powers Bill first shown in 2012, dubbed the "Snooper's Charter" by critics, have been slammed ahead of its presentation to Parliament on Wednesday. Home secretary Theresa May claims that "contentious" parts of the bill have been removed in this draft, but it's not enough to please whistleblower Edward Snowden and other privacy activists. 

The UK...

By Ryan Daws, 03 November 2015, 0 comments. Categories: Government, Industry, Privacy, Security.

Global Cyber Alliance is formed – aims to combat increasing cybercrime

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Manhattan District Attorney Cyrus R. Vance, Jr., City of London Police Commissioner Adrian Leppard, and the Center for Internet Security (CIS) today announced the formation of the Global Cyber Alliance (GCA), an international, cross-sector effort designed to confront, address, and prevent malicious cyber activity. 

Cybercrime-related headlines seem to make the news every...

By Ryan Daws, 16 September 2015, 0 comments. Categories: Government, N America, Privacy, Security.

US Navy prepares for cyber warfare offensive

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Individuals behind their computers might sound less-frightening than the nuclear weapons of past, but as we've seen depicted in fictional-but-realistic video games such as Call of Duty, compromising the right systems can have devastating consequences.

Most governments have been setting-up dedicated teams to help defend against such modern attacks, including the UK who set-up...

By Ryan Daws, 08 April 2015, 0 comments. Categories: Government, N America, Security.

Opinion: Reactionary surveillance will boost extremist groups

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After the Charlie Hebdo attacks in France, much of the world rallied around the magazine's right to free speech; even if they didn't necessarily agree with its content. In such a tragedy, it was a heart-warming response which united people of all background rather than divide. Unfortunately, that unification is now in danger thanks to proposed surveillance efforts.

Radical groups are often formed...

By Ryan Daws, 29 January 2015, 0 comments. Categories: Government, Security, Surveillance.

Opinion: Digital privacy is becoming extinct

Recent high-profile events are being used to bring back discussion about how our data is protected, and how much government bodies should have access to. Some cybersecurity experts even claim that evidence points towards some of the alleged attacks - such as the vandalism of the CENTCOM Twitter account - as being "inside jobs" designed to push surveillance legislation.

The law requires new cars to contain a black box which records all data about movements and faults

In the UK,...

By Ryan Daws, 13 January 2015, 1 comment. Categories: Government, Privacy, Security, Surveillance.

Surveillance is not a human rights violation, UK tribunal rules

Just days after we reported the NSA has access to 70% of the world's cellphone networks through monitoring high-value communications and exploiting network weaknesses; the UK has announced the results of a tribunal investigation into whether mass surveillance on citizens is an infringement on human rights.

Rights groups including 'Privacy International' and 'Bytes for All' took their case to...

By Ryan Daws, 08 December 2014, 2 comments. Categories: Government, Privacy, Regulation, Security, Surveillance.

NSA: AURORAGOLD accessed 70% of cellphone networks

In documents released by US whistleblower Edward Snowden, it has been revealed the NSA has access to 70% of mobile networks worldwide. The initiative called 'Project AURORAGOLD' aims to ensure the agency can exploit weaknesses in cellphone technology for surveillance whenever required for government operations.

Influential UK-based trade group, the GSM Association, was one of the NSA's...

By Ryan Daws, 04 December 2014, 0 comments. Categories: Government, Networks, Operators, Privacy, Security.

Carrier-targeting malware Regin linked to spy agencies

The biggest security news of the week revolves around Symantec’s comprehensive report about Regin, a sophisticated piece of malware which has been tracked back as far as 2008. It’s a story similar to leaks about the NSA’s mass surveillance capabilities last year which – until Edward Snowden’s revelations – was something we knew existed but didn’t realise as to what extent.

One particular case in the Middle East has victims creating a mass peer-to-peer network

You...

By Ryan Daws, 25 November 2014, 0 comments. Categories: Infrastructure, Research, Security.

NSA: China can shut down our power grid

At a hearing of the House Intelligence Committee, the director of the National Security Agency and head of US Cyber Command, Michael Rogers, revealed that several countries are performing regular electronic surveillance on the US to place themselves in a position where they are able to cause havoc with vital control systems.

It is easy to cover-up a cyberattack with the right know-how.

Experts outside of the government have warned about this potential scenario for some time, but it’s the first time it...

By Ryan Daws, 21 November 2014, 0 comments. Categories: Industry, Infrastructure, Research, Security.

Tor domains seized by police were fakes

For privacy advocates, Tor is a godsend. For the police, it's a nightmare. Tor is often used for illegal 'darknet' services due to its ability to anonymise users and make it difficult for law enforcement to track and seize the domains. Last week, authorities thought they had a win on their hands after claiming 414 domains had been taken down...

NSA workers discussed their frustration in spying on people who use Tor.

According to Australian blogger, Nik Cubrilovic, a web crawl he performed on the darknet...

By Ryan Daws, 18 November 2014, 0 comments. Categories: Research, Security.

France prepares for cyber-warfare, whilst US accuses Putin of JP Morgan attack

Cyber-warfare tensions are increasing with two big stories making the rounds; France has staged a large-scale cyber-attack to help the country defend itself from such a scenario, whilst Russia president Vladimir Putin has been accused of being behind an actual cyber-attack on a US-based financial firm.

JP Morgan was hit alongside seven other financial institutions and 76 million accounts had names and email addresses stolen but no evidence has been found of money being moved. There is a lack of evidence surrounding the whole incident, but IP addresses are thought to have originated from Russia.

The test wasn't a result of the US' accusations of Putin, but rather the fear caused by...

By Ryan Daws, 10 October 2014, 0 comments. Categories: Infrastructure, Security.

Marriott: The ethics of Wi-Fi blocking

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Hotel-chain Marriott has caused a stir resulting in a $600,000 fine due to blocking customers Wi-Fi hotspots and using their advantageous position to charge a whopping $250 - $1000 per device to use the hotel's own service.

"Consumers who purchase cellular data plans should be able to use them without fear that their personal Internet connection will be blocked by their hotel or conference center," said Enforcement Bureau Chief Travis LeBlanc.

Gaylord Opryland...

By Ryan Daws, 06 October 2014, 2 comments. Categories: Government, Industry, Security, WiFi.